Using a Boss VT-1 Voice Changer with a PC Mic - HowTo


#1

Have a page up on how I got it working (soldering required!).

It will apply to any situation where you need to hook a PC mic up to non-PC equipment (to, say, process it before feeding it to your PC).


Also note, I see that there is such thing as a VT-3 now. Have not handled this device (and probably won’t as my VT-1 does fine), but it looks pretty schmik!


#2

damn fine website
who woulda though that blakes7 made it to OZ


#3

I once-upon-a-time had a PC case I made out of, amongst other things, one of those old HUGE tower cases, an old domestic hot water tank and a spherical vacuum-cleaner (likely the same model the BBC props people used!) that resembled Slave - my favorite sci-fi computer. Sadly, no pictures and it was too big to take with me when I worked overseas for several years and too hard/expensive to store.

Edit: I lie - here is a bit of it early in construction and partially assembled from the edge of an old photo in my archive!

You can see the main tank and the bottom of the spinny-hemisphere set. Also the front of the huge PC tower case on the left side of the tank (if you squint real hard and use your imagination!). I miss that tower case. I had a second, unmodified, one which I left with my brother. Who used it as a wicket for weekend BBQ cricket games! :-/

My present (boring generic white-box) workstation tower could be marginally upgraded by a 2015-gen intel NUC, if they made one with an i7 and irisPro integrated graphics. I might have to build a NUC board into ORAC!

Actually I am presently working on wooden design prototypes of a case to be made of milled-out cast-iron plates for a completely silent passive-cooled workstation. Working diagonally opposite my university’s engineering facility is very nice! :slight_smile:


#4

Did the ORAC replica shut down if you pulled the little rectangular “key” out? :smiley:


#5

Yes. Complete with a ‘wind down’ sound effect. I also have the start-up sound for when you put in the key and the running hum. :wink:

In my original version (circa 1990s) I did it all with an oscillator and some capacitors, resistors and diodes, though the shut-down sound was never very satisfactory. The current iteration just uses Arduino micro-controller beep-sound capabilities, and is more accurate to the TV show version.


B7 geek that I am, my work computer has the startup sound set to:

“State your program requirements! They will be implemented when capacity is available!”

and the shut-down sound to:

“I am closing down. I have much to do. You have engaged my processing on your petty affairs for far too long!”


#6

He he. I just reinstated (the still relevant parts of) my old Blakes7 tribute site. :blush:


#7

http://spleenal.blogspot.co.uk/2014/07/i-want-lo-fi-blakes-7-re-boot.html friends blog o.o


#8

I use always my line-in for input. and line-out for the amplifier and headphones.
And here im getting a bit scary that the ocluus rift is based on build in soundcard, that woudl be complete useless for me. Really hope the make the oculus in a way it works with normal audio cables and existing sound cards.

This device you talk about right ? http://www.bossus.com/gear/productdetails.php?ProductId=414 sounds intressting.


#9

Intressting device, but sofar i can only find the i guess moire expensive Roland VT-3: Voice Transformer here. http://www.rolandce.com/be/nl/producten/dance-groove/dj-remix/vt-3/


#10

The VT-1 may no longer be in production. I have had mine for several years. And then I had to order it from a supplier overseas as it was not available in Australia.


#11

Okay back on topic :slight_smile:

The page is edited to my satisfaction and has all the pictures. Enjoy!


#12

I bought one of these:

http://www.dx.com/p/usb-2-0-guitar-audio-cable-305cm-length-118467

on spec (knowing if it didn’t do what I wanted I could give it to my guitar-playing brother). It works perfectly plugged into the 6mm output jack of the VT-1.

With the recent updates to HDMI audio in the Linux Kernel, I am getting into a position where the mainboard’s noisy integrated audio can be completely shut down.